Girl Scouts Advocacy

In Girl Scouting, advocacy is a critical leadership skill for girls. Through local and national program initiatives, we are encouraging a new generation of girls and young women to engage in issue advocacy starting in their local communities. Whether those issues are Internet safety, interest in math and science, or school wellness policies, advocacy efforts can be very empowering for young people, especially when they realize their ability to influence change.

Advocacy 101:

“In Girl Scouting, advocacy is defined as a clear and comprehensive action plan that establishes the Movement as a premier expert on and voice for girls. Advocacy includes all forms of active support for or against a cause, idea or policy that impacts girls and Girl Scouting.”

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 National Advocacy

Honorary Girl Scout Troop 1920

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On the 100th Anniversary of Girl Scouting in the United States, Arizona’s Girl Scouts- Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona and Girl Scouts Arizona Cactus-Pine Council- celebrated the official pinning of Honorary Troop 1920 at the State Capitol. Troop 1920, comprised of all female lawmakers, is a bipartisan delegation seeking to educate our state’s legislative body on issues affecting girls and young women. Troop 1920 Members will serve as role models for Arizona’s girls and connect Girl Scouts to policy issues important to girl and Girl Scouting in furtherance of our mission to build girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

Did You Know?

  • The first Girl Scout handbook was published in 1913 and was entitled How Girl Can Help Their Country
  • Congress chartered the Girl Scouts in March 1950
  • Two-thirds of female members of Congress have been Girl Scouts
  • In Savannah, Georgia, in 1983, the second federal building named after a woman was declared the Juliette Gordon Low Federal Complex
  • In 2001, the first Honorary Congressional Girl Scout Troop- Troop Capitol Hill- was convened and is currently comprised of all women members of Congress